Official visitor information site for Durham, NC

Relocation Questions

How does Durham’s public school system compare to others?

Durham's White, African-American, Latino, and Asian public school students consistently score higher than state and national averages for the SAT. They also test at or above grade level in percentages comparable to similar students in adjacent counties. The bottom line is that all of the public school systems in the Research Triangle Region compare quite favorably to systems nationwide, and families can focus their relocation decisions on the communities that lessen traffic and commute times and fulfill lifestyle preferences. Click here to visit the Durham Public Schools website.

What is the terrain like in Durham?

Durham is located at the eastern edge of North Carolina’s Piedmont region at the point where elevations drop off toward Raleigh and the Coastal Plain. Durham is characterized by 98,000 acres of hardwood and evergreen forests, including the Piedmont’s only remaining old-growth forests and 7,800 acres of cropland. Durham includes hills and dales, meandering rivers and streams, several lakes, 26 rare plant species, and several rare species of animals.

What cities or towns are located in Durham County?

Durham is a single-city county with the City of Durham as its seat. Durham-based Research Triangle Park is not a city but rather a special Durham County research and production tax district. Durham County also includes unincorporated areas or neighborhoods called Bahama, Rougemont, and Bethesda, which are referenced for tax and voting purposes.

Are taxes high in Durham?

Durham is home to several tax-advantaged organizations like Duke University and Research Triangle Park, but a third of the county is set aside in watershed, so this narrows the tax burden some. The tax rate in Durham is higher than in some communities, but this can be deceptive because the assessed valuation here is usually lower.

What are the Durham slogans?

Durham is the "Bull City," first coined in the 19th century when Bull Durham Tobacco was popular but now linked mostly with the Triple-A Durham Bulls and Bull Durham the movie. Durham is also known officially as the "City of Medicine, USA," because 1 in 4 people here are employed in health care. The City of Durham also makes use of the slogan “Good Things Are Happening In Durham.” The slogan for Durham County is "A County with MERIT” (Medicine, Education, Research, Industry, and Technology).

What are Durham neighborhoods like?

Durham has everything from multi-million-dollar homes at golf courses and lakes to bungalows and cottages in historic neighborhoods. There are Downtown Durham lofts, planned communities, country homes, retirement villages, and working agricultural and horse farms. Durham may have the best home values in the Triangle region, and everything is close by to the Triangle's largest employers.

What is crime like in Durham?

Durham’s crime rate compares favorably with its Southeast regional and national peer groups.

How is Durham governed?

The City of Durham has a strong, council-manager form of government with a seven-member City Council, which includes the Mayor. The County of Durham is governed by a five-member Board of County Commissioners and operated by a County Manager. Durham elects two State Senators and four State Representatives to the North Carolina General Assembly.

What is Durham's identity or image?

Scientific public-opinion polls show that 68% of Durham residents are pleased or very pleased with their community compared to 15.7% who are not. Over 59% are proud or very proud of their community. Many Durham residents are activists and progressive by nature. New ideas in Durham get a full, public discussion, and historically Durham has been very tolerant of others. Physically, the community is very textured, authentic, ethnically diverse. It hits "fast-forward" without saying goodbye to "yesterday." Decisions in Durham tend to be populist.

December 14 - April 27, 2014

"Another Look: Appropriation In Art" Art Exhibit

Since the turn of the 20th century, artists have appropriated imagery from well-known works of art, commodities and the media in order to make a statement about art’s relationship to, and place within, our world. The artists included in this installation use appropriation in their own way and for their own purposes, addressing themes of identity, politics, economics, history and nostalgia. Central to all of these works are questions of originality and the processes that go into making art. This installation includes works from the Nasher Museum’s collection by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Alice Wagner, Vik Muniz, Alexander Kosolapov and others. Admission $5, $4 seniors, $3 non-Duke students with student ID.

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